A little about me

My name is Russell Darnley.  I grew up in Sydney, at Coogee to be precise.  The banner image is from a place just south of Coogee beach where I often went with my grandfather.  The ocean was the edge of the world for me as a child.  Ships came and went, they were our link to what lay beyond.  Oceans are effectively borderless and touch every continent.  This was an early realisation.

I attended Coogee Public School, later Randwick Boys HS and completed my formal education at the University of Sydney.  I began teaching in 1971.  While at university I paid my way by working as a Television Camera Operator with the University of Sydney Television Service, and a Parks and Gardens worker for Randwick Council.

My time at University was one of social and political change.  Conscription and our seemingly pointless involvement in the Vietnam War were major issues. I was active in the struggle against war and conscription.

I taught until 1980, working in Belmore, Lithgow and Balmain high schools.  From 1980 till 1985 I worked in educational consultancy as the Project Officer for the  Disadvantaged Schools Program in the NSW Department of Education (now DEC). In the early 1970s I also managed to teach briefly in the UK and take several trips in Europe and S E Asia.

Between 1984 and 1987 I completed a Certificate 4 Course in Bahasa Indonesia through Sydney Technical College and in 1984 co-founded Asian Field Study Centres Pty Ltd, an Australian company conducting field study programs for students visiting Indonesia. This project made it necessary to maintain a house in both Lilyfield, Sydney and Ubud,  Bali. I also coordinated a team of writers in producing the book, Geografi Australia, for Indonesian secondary schools and worked as a consultant in areas related to Australia’s relationship with Indonesia.

My time in Indonesia gave me the opportunity to consolidate knowledge of the language and the country’s many regional cultures.  This also afforded me the opportunity to travel widely and work on several Indonesia related film and television productions.

In 2000 after a considerable period of reflection and study, along with further travel in Egypt, Turkey and Greece, I became an Orthodox Christian.  In the end what precipitated my decision was meeting the Monks from the Holy Transfiguration Monastery, near Bombala.  My Orthodox name is Maximos.

After the Bali Bombings of 2002 I returned to Australia and was awarded the OAM for my voluntary work following the bombings.

I was a writer and researcher on the Le@rning Federation’s (TLF) LOTE2 and Studies of Australia 2 & 3  projects.  Subsequently I scoped, researched and wrote interactions in Indonesian for the TLF’s MALL Project, (see final report) conducted in association with Learnosity.

A particular interest of mine is the restitution of cultural property, taken under many guises and in many different times of change.  The world’s most celebrated cultural property dispute is the issue of the Parthenon Marbles (mistakenly called the Elgin Marbles).  This unique collections of carved marble sculptures is now accommodated in the British Museum.  In Athens a purpose built museum awaits their return.

In December and January 2009-10 I made my first return visit to Indonesia since the Bali Bombings of 2002. I returned again in 2010-11.

In 2010 I completed work on a 1:1 laptop action research project as part of the Digital Education Revolution initiated by Australian Government. This project explored urban processes operating in the Sydney CBD, Darling and City West areas. I teach History and Geography.

Approaching the end of my formal teaching career, and reflecting on what I’ve learned as a teacher, I produced this Time Warp Pecha Kucha  that can be viewed on YouTube.  The Pecha Kucha was created for the 2011 Virtual Teach Meet, in Sydney.

Now retired and living in Singapore I continue to explore the region and to write.

I’ve now completed my book Seen and Unseen: a century of stories from Asia and the Pacific comprising 29 stories about Australia’s relationship with the region.

This Blog is now archived by Pandora

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Responses

  1. Dear Mr Darnley,
    The National Library aims to build a comprehensive collection of Australian on-line publications by identifying and archiving online publications that meet our collecting scope and priorities. PANDORA, Australia’s web archive and access to archived titles can be found on the Library’s web site.
    If you could provide an e-mail address to discuss archiving your blog that would be greatly appreciated.

    Yours sincerely,
    Caitlin Prescott

  2. your journey very amazing mister


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